Art Newsletter

Fall 2019

Mandy Bohner '83

Early Learning Center

     In the Early Learning Center this year, our art curriculum is based on a combination of cultural art history and the stories being told within the ELC classes.  We began with a look at the varied world of Native American art, focusing on storytelling and how to show those stories through visual art. After hearing the legends, the children created mixed media rabbits, drawings of crows, button blankets featuring Little Red Riding Hood, totem poles based on Goldilocks and the Three Bears and cat paintings featuring one of the cats from the Three Little Kittens. Additionally, the children are working on weaving skills as they weave crepe paper and beads into plastic baskets. 
     From Native American art, we moved on to the art of Japan.  We learned about the artist, Yayoi Kusama, specifically her dotted pumpkins, with each child painting his or her own. In addition to the paintings, the children also practiced their cutting skills while making collages featuring painted plates and paper sushi.
     We also took some time for our first ceramic project: clay pinch pot jack-o-lanterns. These, and their other projects, are all well done and I am very proud of them all! The children come into class ready to learn and ready to create, and do so with enthusiasm and imagination each and every time. Their artwork can be found hanging in the ELC hall - come take a look if you are on campus.

older girl showing her hand made sculpture creationchildren creating sculpture from clayyoung boy painting in art class

Lower Primary

     As cultural art is our focus this year, we began with a look at the varied world of Native American art, focusing on storytelling and how to show those stories through visual art. After hearing the legends, the children created mixed media rabbits, drawings of crows, button blankets and totem poles.  Additionally, the children learned how to create circular weavings using circle looms. 
     From Native American art, we moved on to the art of Japan.  We learned about the artist, Yayoi Kusama, specifically her dotted pumpkins, with each child painting his or her own version of a Kusama pumpkin. In addition to the paintings, the children also practiced their fine motor skills while making collages featuring painted plates and paper sushi.
     We also took some time for our first ceramic project: clay pinch pot jack-o-lanterns. These, and their other projects, are all well done and I am proud of all of them! The children come into class ready to learn and ready to create, and do so with enthusiasm and imagination each and every time. Their artwork can be found hanging in the cafeteria - come take a look if you are on campus.

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Middle Primary

     As cultural art is our focus this year, we began with a look at the varied world of Native American art, focusing on storytelling and how to show those stories through visual art. After hearing the legends, the children created mixed media rabbits, drawings of crows, and totem poles.  Additionally, the children learned how to create circular weavings using circle looms.
     From Native American art, we moved on to the art of Japan.  We learned about the artist, Yayoi Kusama, specifically her dotted pumpkins, with each child painting his or her own version of a Kusama pumpkin. In addition to the paintings, the children also created collages featuring painted plates and paper sushi.
     We also took some time for our first ceramic project: clay pinch pot jack-o-lanterns. These, and their other projects, are all well done and I am proud of all of them! The children come into class ready to learn and ready to create, and do so with enthusiasm and imagination each and every time. Their artwork can be found hanging in the Chapel/Fine Arts building - come take a look if you are on campus.

group of young children painting in art classtwo girls creating painted and glitter platesgirl showing her painting of grass and flowers

Upper Primary

     As cultural art is our focus this year, we began with a look at the varied world of Native American art, focusing on storytelling and how to show those stories through visual art. After hearing the legends, the children created mixed media rabbits, drawings of crows, and totem poles.  Additionally, we looked at two of the textiles found in Native American art: coiled basketry and woven blankets, both of which are very challenging! These are still ongoing, as they are time-intensive projects; however, upon completion, the coiled circles are displayed in the chapel and the woven pouches make their way home. 
     From Native American art, we moved on to the art of Japan.  We learned about the artist, Yayoi Kusama, specifically her dotted pumpkins, with each child painting his or her own version of a Kusama pumpkin. Kusama is not only known for pumpkins, but also for her art, which reflects her quotation, “I am just another dot in the world.” In her museum exhibits, one might find what she calls an Obliteration Room, which essentially is a white room in which spectators are encouraged to add their own (sticker) dots to the walls and furniture, or basically any item on display.  Following her lead, Upper Primary students “dotted” the Robbins Gallery in the Chapel/Fine Arts building.  If you have a moment, come check the space out - from the painted pumpkins to the Obliteration Room, St. Nicholas style, it is a sight to see.
     We also took some time for our first ceramic project: clay pinch-pot jack-o-lanterns. These, and their other projects, are all well done and I am proud of all of them! The children come into class ready to learn and ready to create, and do so with enthusiasm, skill and imagination each and every time. Their artwork can be found hanging in the Chapel/Fine Arts building - come take a look if you are on campus.
     Additionally, during the month of October we have worked on preparing art for our upcoming exhibit, “A Living Wall,” which opens on Saturday, November 1, with a reception at 10:00, and will hang through November. The children are excited about this opportunity, and I look forward to showing the city how talented our students are!


ST NICHOLAS SCHOOL 7525 Min Tom Drive | Chattanooga, Tennessee 37421 | ph: (423).899.1999 | fax: (423).899.0109 | [email protected]